Thursday, May 6, 2010

The Chile Diary Chapter 12

The mom's guests



I set up my computer on the dining table and began to write. If I was looking for common sense to guide the mom and her guests, I was disappointed. Common sense was very conspicuous by its absence. They continued to sit around the table and chat in that high pitched sing-song way most Chilean women use. My head was beginning to ache. Just as I thought I should pack shop, the jing-bang got up and left, mom included. I broke into a Hallelujah chorus! About half an hour later they trooped in and the women began setting the table for tea. It was past seven in the evening! OMG! I moaned, not again? The gossiping, laughing and chomping went on and on. I glared at them from time to time but it was useless. Their total concentration was in the cake, bread, ham, palta, crackers and butter and tea and cold drinks they were walloping, as they kept up the steady high-pitched conversation. By now my head was really throbbing. I held my temples and looked directly at each one. I saw their mouths open and close but I couldn’t hear them talk. It was time for me to get up. I wasn’t in good shape and if I stayed longer I knew I’d say something and it wouldn't be anything very nice. I didn’t feel very appreciative of the mom right then. She should have warned me it would be an 'extended lunch' or better still an 'eat-a-thon.'



I discovered today that Indian beauticians were way ahead of their Chilean counterparts. And charged so little for the work they did. I needed to give some attention to my feet, so Manu took me to a place near-by. I got a pedicure done for eight thousand pesos, which roughly converts to eight hundred rupees, for half the service rendered in India. If it weren’t for my back and knees that prevent me from cleaning my feet thoroughly, I’d skip the pedicure in Chile. India, India.....things are so much more affordable back home. (Thank God Roxanna coloured my hair at her place) Manu warned me not to even try the manicure. After the pedicure I wouldn’t have any way.



So thus went my day. No more to write, so I’ll wind up. Then what? As usual stare at the walls and then lie on my bed and try not to think sad thoughts. For some reason these words of an old Hindi song pop up in my mind.....



Aye mere dil-e-nadaan, tu gham se na ghabrana
Ek din toh samajh legi, duniya tera afsana.

(O my naive heart, don't let sorrow worry you
One day this world will understand your story)

Armaan bhare dil mein, zakhmon ko jagah dede
Bhadke huye sholon ko, kuch aur hawaa dede
Banti hai toh ban jaye, yeh zindagi afsana.


(In a heart full of dreams and expectations, allow a bit of space for hurt and pain. The embers have burst into flame, fan them a bit more. If your life has become a story, let it be so)

Faryaad se kya haasil, rone se natija kya
Bekaar hain yeh baatein, in baton se hoga kya
Apna bhi ghari bar mein, ban jaata hai begaana
.

(Nothing comes from complaining and tears bring no results. These are useless things and nothing is achieved by it. In a split second even our own become strangers)

Aye mere dil-e-nadaan, tu gham se na ghabrana
Ek din toh samajh legi, duniya tera afsana.


(O my naive heart, don't let sorrow worry you
One day this world will understand your story)

4 comments:

  1. Music is such an integral part of us. We have grown up with these songs : Aye mere dil-e-nadaan, tu gham se na ghabrana. Ek din toh samajh legi, duniya tera afsana. I have often admired the creative spirit that manifests itself through such songs - gently touching us in its flow. Thanks Khushi

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  2. Thanks to you Raj, for reading and appreciating my efforts at writing. Yes, aren't these verses so poignant? I love the old songs for their beautiful lyrics and music.

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  3. Thanks Marlene. I've tried to translate it as aptly as possible, but one loses the essense and beauty of the original in translation.

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