Sunday, March 25, 2012

The 'Awesome' Of You




A few remarks about me made by a few people I reconnected with after years and years, got me wondering about the manner in which people think and comment with such insensitivity, and the way these remarks could affect the person they were aimed at. Not only do these people have nothing worthwhile to comment on or talk about other than my weight gain and why I had allowed myself to become "like this" (which translates to overweight) but they also avoid meeting me in person, because they "refuse to recognise the present you as the old 'awesome' you."



Thankfully such things are like water on a duck's back for me, but is that how it would roll off another person without any negative effect? To me being or feeling awesome has nothing to do with physical appearance and most importantly never ever dependent on another's perception or yardstick or socially accepted benchmark. But not everyone would think the same way. Confidence levels vary, self perceptions are influenced when approval matters and such thoughtless remarks have the potential to damage a person's self esteem. I was ruminating on the subject when I happened to read someone's thoughts on the same topic. It is simple, honest and seems to come from one who has experienced directly or indirectly the harshness of social disapproval. I am sharing the note whose author remains anonymous.





"There was a time when you were five years old, and you woke up full of ‘awesome! You knew you were awesome. You loved yourself. You thought you were beautiful even with missing teeth and messy hair, and mismatched socks inside your grubby sneakers. You loved your body and the things it could do. You thought you were strong. You knew you were smart.



Do you still have it.....the ‘awesome’? Or did someone take it from you? Did you let them?



Did you hand it over because someone told you, you weren’t beautiful enough, thin enough, smart enough, good enough? Why would you listen to them? Did you consider that they might be wrong?



Wouldn’t it be nuts to tell a little five year old that in another five or ten years she might hate herself because she doesn’t look like a starving or photoshop(ped) fashion model? Or even more bizarre, that she should be sexy over smart; beautiful over bold. Are you kidding me? Look at that five year old...look at her, she is full of awesome!



You were once and maybe you still are. Or maybe you are in the process of getting it back. All I know is that if you are not waking up feeling like this about yourself, you are really missing out!"

(Anonymous)



It's a pity most of us can not see the child inside; can not feel the awesomeness of the 'being' we are. Do you wake up feeling awesome? Do you look at the mirror and see an awesome you?

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10 comments:

  1. Now that is an AWESOME post. You are awesome and that doesn't have anything to do with how much you weigh but how substantial your heart is!

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  2. Your post is full of wisdom.
    Wish more people were wise, sensitive and thought before passing abrasive remarks. No matter how much we brush away hurtful remarks, they do singe us. Make someone 'awesome' not awful, right? Thanks for writing.

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    1. "Make someone 'awesome' not awful" what a wonderful thought. Thanks Za faran.

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  3. I enjoyed this; it is a wonderful reminder of the childlike qualities we should all retain as adults. We grow too serious too fast sometimes, I think. I recall thinking I was rather awesome around the age of 5, and perhaps I need to adopt more of that mentality again. Thanks for the encouragement and the challenge to look at things a little differently.

    Have a lovely week!
    Karen

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  4. Having heard the expression “sticks & stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me” - we are still vulnerable to “words” – said & not said, as you have expressed so well Khushi. Gradually – we sort of grow out of it – one hopes !

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    1. Yes, one hopes that one has grown out of it! But how many can actually remain unaffected? Thanks Raj.

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  5. Helen, Thanks a ton....you are so right. A substantial heart is all that matters!

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  6. Loved your post, Khushi! Having kids of my own, who are of the awesome age of five and less, I am reminded everyday of the true 'awesomeness' of our beings. It's true we all get affected to varying degrees with such judgemental comments from others. Over the years, I am realizing the superficiality of these comments, and how they reflect more about the person delivering them, and less about the real you.

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    1. Thanks SprigBlossoms. The awesome fives or 'terrible' twos...hehe....aren't they just awwwesomme! I miss that period of my mothering years and have great memories of my two boys when they were just that..Boys!You are so right. These comments reflect more of the speaker's attitude than anything else.

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